Reading White Collar Crime Lawyer

What is a white collar crime?

A white collar crime can involve any type of nonviolent financial crime. This type of crime is commonly committed by business people as a way to gain finances. White collar crimes generally involve fraud, embezzlement or some sort of dishonest plan. Oftentimes the act in question is borderline illegal but the intention of the defendant has a lot to do with the charge. With the help of a skilled criminal defense lawyer in Reading, you may be able to show that you lacked criminal intent and the charges can be reduced or dismissed. White collar crimes lack aspects of violence that other crimes have, but the penalties are still severe. Searching for a lawyer for your criminal case in Reading? Contact a Reading criminal defense attorney from Curtis E. Barnes, Attorney at Law if you are facing white collar crime charges.

Crimes Considered to be White Collar Crimes in PA

The term white collar crime is sometimes interchanged with the term economic crime because of the involvement of fraud and financial gain. Some of the crimes that fall under this category of charges include:

  • Forgery
  • Fraud
  • Tampering with record
  • Deceptive business practices
  • Bribery
  • Identity theft
  • Embezzlement
  • Perjury
  • Money laundering
  • Theft
  • Counterfeiting
  • RICO Claims

There are several different types of fraud that would qualify as a white collar crime. Credit card fraud, healthcare fraud, mail fraud, bank fraud, wire fraud, securities fraud and insurance fraud are just a few. Any of these crimes hold strict criminal penalties that could affect the rest of your life. Fines and jail time are not the only consequences at risk. Being convicted of a white collar crime could taint your reputation as a business person and ruin your future career. Fight against your charges and avoid the many consequences that a conviction can bring by teaming up the best criminal attorney in Reading!

Criminal Penalties for White Collar Crimes in Pennsylvania

The penalties for these crimes vary according to the specific offense. For example, money laundering is one of the most serious white collar crimes and it is punishable by up to 20 years in prison. This crime involves using financial transactions to hide illegally- earned money. Embezzlement is another serious offense because of the involvement of a trusted relationship. This crime involves taking money or property from someone who has entrusted it to you to monitor, for example, a bank teller taking money from a consumer's account. Embezzlement is punishable by probation or up to seven years in prison along with a fine depending on what was stolen. Fraud is one of the most common white collar crimes in Pennsylvania and the penalties depend on the type of fraud. Some of the penalties include:

  • Credit Card Fraud- between two and seven years in prison depending on the amount involved
  • Insurance Fraud- between five and seven years in prison depending on the defendant and the deception involved
  • Securities Fraud- up to seven years in prison

Identity theft is another white collar crime punishable by between five and ten years in prison. If you would like to discuss your unique charges and the possible penalties, feel free to contact me at Curtis E. Barnes, Attorney at Law.

Defend Against your White Collar Crime Charges

The key to many of these charges is having criminal intent or the intent to receive a financial gain dishonestly. Team up with a Reading white collar crime attorney from my firm for the representation that you need. I have 18 years of experience when it comes to defending individuals in their criminal cases and I may be able to help you. By building a strong defense and challenging the evidence of the prosecutor, I can fight to have your charges reduced or dismissed. Contact me today for the aggressive and experienced representation that you need!

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The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.